Bombay Hook National Wildlife Reserve

One of the most interesting places to visit in the east coast of the United States is Bombay Hook National Wildlife Reserve.  Is it by Delaware Bay and the reserve is a major stop in the Atlantic Flyway , the route that most birds take when they migrate northwards or southwards.  This means that birds almost always make a stop at Bombay Hook during the spring and fall migration season.  It makes it easier for non expert birders like myself to find birds to photograph.

Bombay Hook is a two hour drive from Northern Virginia.  You head to Annapolis, Maryland and then cross the Bay Bridge towards the Eastern Shore.  You proceed towards Wilmington, Delaware though you actually end up near Smyrna.  Since you need to get to the reserve around sunrise, you generally have to leave at 4AM or a little earlier to get there on time.  Every trip yields different photo opportunities.  Just don’t come here in the summer.  You will be eaten alive by mosquitoes, flies and other biting insects.  Actually, if you have a thick skin and/or love insects (which birds apparently do), this could be the place to be in the summer.  It is only a short drive from the Delaware Atlantic beaches.  It is also a short drive from Wilmington, Delaware.

Bombay Hook has plenty of short walking trails that allow different views of the marshes and pools that dot the reserve.  There are, of course, a lot of trees, bushes, flowers and other things that hide birds (and feed birds) quite well.  My musings on Bombay Hook will be comprised of multiple postings.  I only started visiting this wildlife reserve earlier this year.  It will be a place that I will return to again and again.

The pictures below were taken on my first trip to Bombay Hook (late April 2017).

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Impressionistic Reflections

Fall is definitely here in Northern Virginia.  The trees are finally resplendent in coloration.  The lack of rain may have dampened the deep red, orange and yellow hues so prevalent in autumns past, but the warm weather affords many opportunities for walks in the parks and nature reserves that dot the Washington area.  Huntley Meadows, with its wetlands replenished by recent rains, is particularly beautiful in the fall.  Reflections are a mirror image of reality and with a little bit of help from a slight breeze, the reality becomes a beautiful dream.  A reflection seen in a calm body of water can be beautiful.  With longer exposure taken with a tripod mounted camera, the slight undulations in the surface, made possible by a gentle wind, transform the beauty of a tranquil day into a treasure of moving colors, a feast for the eyes.DSC09361_sDSC09365_s

Mid Autumn Birding in Northern Virginia

I must admit that the russet, orange, yellow and green umbrella of leaves didn’t leave much room for finding birds and taking pictures of them on my walk at Huntley Meadows.  I must also admit that it doesn’t take that long to walk a three mile trail, unless you’re walking back and forth looking for birds (and not finding them).  As I entered the trail at Huntley Meadows, there were some forlorn photographers, with their long lenses and tripods leaving the park.  I didn’t want to ask how the birding was, but after ten minutes of walking, I could not resist to ask someone how their morning had gone.  Not a lot of interesting things, or something like that, was the verbal answer.  It was a confirmation of a supposition answered in the faces of many a photographer walking the trails at the park.  Not very promising, but at least there were leaves.

And a good thing that red, orange, yellow and green were in copious quantity.  Did it make up for a lack of birds?  No.  The lesser number of birds in the park, combined with the masking quality of the colors in the trees, combined with my inadequate skills at bird spotting really limited the number of opportunities for spotting a bird.  On a beautiful autumn day, the birds may have been there, but so where the leaves.  Still, it would have been nice to find more of our avian friends.  A lot more practice at bird spotting lies ahead.  A great way to enjoy the wonderful beauty that nature provides.

Depicting a Windy Day

In my earlier write up, I talked about walking around Huntley Meadows on a windy day.  How can one convey motion in a static image?  Blur.  Wind causes motion over time.  Decreasing the shutter speed will introduce blur to an image.  This can be used to an advantage.  Mount your camera on a tripod and pick a shutter speed around 1/20 of a second or even slower.  The result can be interesting.

Why look at the same static pictures of red, orange, yellow, green and brown leaves hanging on the branches of a tree?  Make your picture move.  Introduce blur.

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You can also select a high contrast scene and introduce a little blur.

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Light + Motion = Emotion.

Mid Autumn in Northern Virginia

It’s almost November and the leaves are finally getting some color in Northern Virginia.  It’s been a relatively dry summer and early fall.  As a consequence, the leaves aren’t really colorful – dull red, dull yellow, dull orange, dull brown.  Still, you will find the occasional brightly colored leaf or two.

Fall is a beautiful time of year here in Northern Virginia.  The weather is relatively mild.  A warm spell can appear like a punctuation mark, like a comma in the middle of a sentence.  On such a day in late October, the sun was shining and Huntley Meadows beckoned.

The birds are no longer plentiful, though they are certainly still flying around at Huntley.  The mallards have returned, but the swallows, egrets, most of the warblers and most of the herons have migrated southward.  Just when the thinning leaf cover makes looking for birds easier they migrate away.  The leaf covered trails, a clean boardwalk (the geese are in much decreased numbers), the cool but comfortable weather, the canopy of colors make for an irresistible invitation to spend a few hours outdoors

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Simply Beautiful

For millennia, as far back as the ancient Egyptians and perhaps beyond that, flowers have been part of the human experience.  What is the first gift that a child gives to his or her mother?  A flower, perhaps a rose, perhaps a dandelion.  Something from the garden or maybe the sidewalk.  A gift of beauty, an act of love.

Flowers of every shape and color stir our imagination.  From the simple drawings of a child, to the masterpieces of Monet, to the songs of Rogers and Hammerstein, to the photographs of Weston, to Mendel’s experiments in genetics – flowers have sparked the creativity of untold millions throughout human history.

Color, shape, dimension, form.   Family, Genus, Species.  We observe.  We study.  We categorize..  Everything is given an attribute.   Flowers are a complex thing, we say.  That may be, but we also know the immutable truth.  A flower, you see, is simply beautiful.

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