The Huntley Triple Stack

A Roseate Spoonbill managed to find its way to Huntley Meadows. It’s been in the wetlands for a week now. Needless to say, the whole birding community in the area is abuzz. A lot of photographers have taken their cameras and tripods, in all hours of the day, to get a picture (well, hundreds of pictures, by the way the cameras sound) of the wayward visitor. Apparently, this bird rarely finds its way north of South Carolina. I don’t know how much longer it will be here, but there is an ample supply of shrimp for it to feed on. And luckily for me, it was in the vicinity of a blue heron when an egret flew by. It’s good to be lucky (at times). Not too often, as one does not want to live life on the expectation of continual good fortune. Sometimes, though, it’s good to be lucky.

The Osprey at Huntley Meadows

For a small wetland area in the middle of suburbia, Huntley Meadows is not only an oasis for trees, plants and flowers, but also a place where raptors can be found. Ospreys regularly hunt and even nest in its confines. Some pictures taken on a recent visit.

Where You Stand Matters

Being in the right place, at the right time, with the right subject, with the wind blowing in your face. Three out of four is okay, but sometimes you need all four things to get the shot you want. Still, good practice on taking pictures of an eagle diving for its meal.

Seen at Huntley Meadows

Nothing spectacular. Just a few images of things that one can expect to see this time of the year (January) at Huntley Meadows, a local wildlife refuge in suburban Alexandria, Virginia. It’s a great place for a walk and for sightseeing.

Gull
Pattern breakers
Mergansers
Water flowing
Feathers caught in twigs

More Practice Needed

I’ve always wanted to take a picture of a kingfisher diving and getting a fish. I stood around watching this kingfisher on a tree. It was fairly far, but I figured with some post processing I can get a decent picture of the bird catching a fish. I stood in a spot for twenty minutes. The kingfisher perched on a branch the whole time. Which tells you that I wasn’t that close to this skittish creature. Suddenly, the bird flew off the branch. Not towards the water and a fish, but towards me. Oh, I got a picture off. Turns out a kingfisher, head on, has little contrast between the grey and white colors of the feathers and the grey beak. And even though the shutter speed was at 1/2500 of a second, it was barely fast enough to stop the motion. More practice needed. And here is the kingfisher, calm as can be, a few minutes before it flew my way.

I edited the branches out of the picture. One day, the bird will be close enough, not be scared, and perch on a branch that is clear of obstructive details. Until then, post processing, when it doesn’t change the actual details too much, will have to do.