Unopened Folder

I was browsing through my computer in search of pictures I can use for a new blog posting.  I noticed a folder that hasn’t been opened in a year.  A year old, untouched, pictures unprocessed – what was inside the folder?  A quick glance reminded me that I was at Huntley Meadows that August day.  In search of birds (probably hummingbirds).  I vaguely remember that after a few hours of August humidity and heat, I went home.  I copied the pictures to my hard drive and did nothing else with them.  Until today.

Browsing through the photographs, I see pictures of hummingbirds.  And dragonflies, butterflies, herons and goldfinches.  Remember the end of “Raiders of the Lost Ark”, when the Ark of the Covenant is placed in a crate and stored in what seems like a never ending warehouse of similar looking crates?  Well, that crate among crates seems like an apt metaphor for all the folders sitting inside my computer.  They all look the same, but they are all different.  I am not claiming to have found the Ark, but I did find some interesting pictures.

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Classic Subject, Vintage Lens

Over the weekend, a very nice lady gave me an old Minolta Rokkor-TC 135mm f4 lens.  This lens is over five decades old.  It was a sunny day yesterday, so it was a good opportunity to test the lens on a classic subject.  It was off to Meadowlark Gardens for a quick lunchtime photo session.  The lens was attached to a modern Sony APS-C mirrorless camera.  Some pictures.

The lens is lacking in contrast compared to modern lenses; this is most noticeable when there is strong backlighting in the image. Focus peaking works quite well and the ability to magnify the area that I am focusing on is very helpful; unfortunately, I was concerned that the butterfly would fly away before I achieved optimum focus on the subject, so I some of the images are not as sharp as they could have been.

The images were sharpened, contrast added, vibrancy and saturation tweaked, and in the case of the featured image, I deleted “unnecessary” objects from the picture to isolate the flowers and butterflies.  I also had to extensively blur the backgrounds on the featured image and on the last image in the set.  Still, the lens is quite nice.  I am looking forward to using this lens for portraiture – it will probably great for that.

The old lenses are certainly worth trying out.  And as the 135mm f4 Rokkor-TC shows, they will be useful tools for decades to come.

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Seven is a Lucky Number

On the seventh day of the seventh month in the seventeenth year of this century (okay, the 7 stuff breaks down on the fourth descriptor), I was fortunate enough to have my camera and macro lens at Meadowlark Gardens.  Some of the best macro images I took over the summer (and in the last few years) were taken that day.  Moth or butterfly?  Beautiful either way.

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How often do you get a bee “facing off” “against” a moth (second image)?  Or two bugs sitting on a beautiful flower filled stem (first image)?  Or have a moth willing to have a lens close enough to see elements in its eye (third image)?