Brrrr…..

After a slew of fairly warm days, I decided to take a walk at one of the local wildlife refuges in Northern Virginia.  Huntley Meadows is one of my favorite places to take walks (with a camera, of course).  There is a central wetland (fairly small) that hosts an abundant variety of birds (especially during the warm months of spring to fall).  In the midst of a relatively warm winter, there have been days that observers reported a wide variety of birds in the refuge.

Yesterday (Saturday) was not one of those days where birds were plentiful and easy to find.  I am sure that trained eyes would do better than I did, but it was barely above 20F when I left for the refuge (about ten miles away), after the sun had been up an hour.  Surprisingly, there were a fair number of people walking around the park.  And there were a fair number of disappointed photographers.

It was cold.  And for the day (at least in the morning), the birds were few in number.  Oh, there were ducks of several sorts and there was an osprey (or something like it) that flew over the boardwalk for a scant ten seconds.  Aside from that, nothing.  It was a cold day for this human.  I suppose the birds don’t really want to go out and about when the wind is brisk and the sun barely peeking out of the clouds.

Oh well.  There were still ducks.

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Trying New Things

Sometimes, you are bereft of ideas.  What to write.  What to photograph.  In times like these, you might as well try to do something different.  Experiment.  It may not result in a great photograph or award winning prose.  Still, to try and fail is a lot better than to sit around and doing nothing.  Here are two pictures.  When I looked at leaves frozen in the wetlands at Huntley Meadows, I started to think of tar pits.  The trees, even without their leafy canopies, were obstructing enough of the sunlight so that the water seemed darker than one would expect.  At the moment I took the picture, I imagined the leaves being trapped in resin (or tar) for millions of years.  And today was the start of their fossilization.  Fossiliced.  An apt title.  It’s different alright.

A few weeks earlier, when the supermoon was rising, I decided to take a picture of the larger than normal moon.  The problem is, that a picture of a full moon, even a supermoon, looks similar to other pictures of the full moon.  I’ve taken pictures of the moon before.  I didn’t have time to drive around to find a suitable (e.g. beautiful view) of the rising moon.  What to do?  Silhouettes.  Leaves against the defocused lunar disk.  A spectacular photograph?  Hardly.  Still, I’ll take a look at this image again one of these days.  And if I’m lucky, another idea (maybe even a better one) will be born.

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