Farewell to a Decade

I am a little late posting this, but if you know me, it’s not unusual.  At times anyway.

It’s time to say goodbye to the second decade of the millennium.  Not just to the years that have gone by, but to the people who now live only in our hearts and in our dreams.  Their spirits are now with the Creator.

And so, with prayers for the health and well being of the world we live in and the people who live in it, happy new year to all.  It’s not quite a new moon, but it’s close enough.

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The stars in the heavens are never as bright as the light within each one of us.

Moments

I walk out of my front door to get the phone from my car and I look up
The crescent moon shines brightly in the quickly darkening sky
Twilight receding, stars ascending and in front of me
Stands mighty Orion, with Rigel’s light blazing forth
And to one side sits Canopus, with the brightest star in the sky
Looking down on me as I gaze upward one more time
And see the beauty that only the sisters can bring
The seven forever chased by the hunter
And as the winter stars meet the horizon ever earlier
In a slowly changing dance, a sequence of moments, each a memory
Spring will come soon enough
The past will be past, but like the stars that circle the earth
They remain with us, reminding us
That what we treasure is not lost
For they will always shine brightly in our hearts
As long as love endures

Meeting before Dawn

I totally forgot that the moon, Jupiter and Venus were going to be in conjunction in the waning days of January.  It was not until morning, near sunrise, as I was taking the trash out, that I looked up in the brightening sky and saw the moon and Venus.  It was seven degrees and I didn’t take many pictures in the crisp January air.  It was, as all astronomical events prove to be, interesting.  And beautiful to behold.

On a cold, cold, cold January Night

A Blood Wolf Super Moon was in view for vast swats of North America.  Did I mention that it was cold?  I wanted to set up the camera on a tripod but it was just a little bit too cold.

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It was quite an interesting site, even in the suburbs.  Fortunately, the moon was almost at its zenith, which made for obstruction free, frozen shooting.  I don’t think I want to be in the Discovery Channel show about living above the arctic circle.  Now, that antarctic winter adventure, however, that is still a dream (or nightmare).

Alive

When the sun closes it’s eyes
And the moon gazes on a world
Bathed in the warmth of the fading day
It casts its gentle glow
And the world finally sleeps
And a million dreams fill the sky
With little points of starlight

Hearts beat in unison
Pulsing with the joys of the day
And with the hope for even better tomorrows
In this quietest of moments
When all is calm
When the mind lifts the veil of uncertainty
Love, at last, can smile

The Blue Super Moon (missed out on the eclipse part)

Two of three isn’t bad, but the missing part made this event special.  In the early morning of the last day in January, the second full moon of the month was setting.  The eclipse – well, that was for other people to see.  This is a composite image of two different images.  The first image exposed for the clouds, the second image exposed for the moon.  This combination was then converted to a black and white image.

Trying New Things

Sometimes, you are bereft of ideas.  What to write.  What to photograph.  In times like these, you might as well try to do something different.  Experiment.  It may not result in a great photograph or award winning prose.  Still, to try and fail is a lot better than to sit around and doing nothing.  Here are two pictures.  When I looked at leaves frozen in the wetlands at Huntley Meadows, I started to think of tar pits.  The trees, even without their leafy canopies, were obstructing enough of the sunlight so that the water seemed darker than one would expect.  At the moment I took the picture, I imagined the leaves being trapped in resin (or tar) for millions of years.  And today was the start of their fossilization.  Fossiliced.  An apt title.  It’s different alright.

A few weeks earlier, when the supermoon was rising, I decided to take a picture of the larger than normal moon.  The problem is, that a picture of a full moon, even a supermoon, looks similar to other pictures of the full moon.  I’ve taken pictures of the moon before.  I didn’t have time to drive around to find a suitable (e.g. beautiful view) of the rising moon.  What to do?  Silhouettes.  Leaves against the defocused lunar disk.  A spectacular photograph?  Hardly.  Still, I’ll take a look at this image again one of these days.  And if I’m lucky, another idea (maybe even a better one) will be born.

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