Brrrr…..

After a slew of fairly warm days, I decided to take a walk at one of the local wildlife refuges in Northern Virginia.  Huntley Meadows is one of my favorite places to take walks (with a camera, of course).  There is a central wetland (fairly small) that hosts an abundant variety of birds (especially during the warm months of spring to fall).  In the midst of a relatively warm winter, there have been days that observers reported a wide variety of birds in the refuge.

Yesterday (Saturday) was not one of those days where birds were plentiful and easy to find.  I am sure that trained eyes would do better than I did, but it was barely above 20F when I left for the refuge (about ten miles away), after the sun had been up an hour.  Surprisingly, there were a fair number of people walking around the park.  And there were a fair number of disappointed photographers.

It was cold.  And for the day (at least in the morning), the birds were few in number.  Oh, there were ducks of several sorts and there was an osprey (or something like it) that flew over the boardwalk for a scant ten seconds.  Aside from that, nothing.  It was a cold day for this human.  I suppose the birds don’t really want to go out and about when the wind is brisk and the sun barely peeking out of the clouds.

Oh well.  There were still ducks.

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Windswept

On the first few days of our trip to Nova Scotia, the sun bid adieu and the clouds rolled into view.  A drizzle here and there reminded us that the Atlantic Coast can be unforgiving.  And yet, in the dank grey skies, you saw the beauty of the land that the hardy Nova Scotians call their home.  The jagged coastline, the waves crashing incessantly on the rock strewn shores, the wind occasionally blowing in your face.   Autumn’s colors had not yet come. The mostly monochromatic views accentuated the ruggedness of the land. When the skies are grey and the wind howls, I sometimes think of those days in Nova Scotia.  And I smile.

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Depicting a Windy Day

In my earlier write up, I talked about walking around Huntley Meadows on a windy day.  How can one convey motion in a static image?  Blur.  Wind causes motion over time.  Decreasing the shutter speed will introduce blur to an image.  This can be used to an advantage.  Mount your camera on a tripod and pick a shutter speed around 1/20 of a second or even slower.  The result can be interesting.

Why look at the same static pictures of red, orange, yellow, green and brown leaves hanging on the branches of a tree?  Make your picture move.  Introduce blur.

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You can also select a high contrast scene and introduce a little blur.

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Light + Motion = Emotion.