The Huntley Triple Stack

A Roseate Spoonbill managed to find its way to Huntley Meadows. It’s been in the wetlands for a week now. Needless to say, the whole birding community in the area is abuzz. A lot of photographers have taken their cameras and tripods, in all hours of the day, to get a picture (well, hundreds of pictures, by the way the cameras sound) of the wayward visitor. Apparently, this bird rarely finds its way north of South Carolina. I don’t know how much longer it will be here, but there is an ample supply of shrimp for it to feed on. And luckily for me, it was in the vicinity of a blue heron when an egret flew by. It’s good to be lucky (at times). Not too often, as one does not want to live life on the expectation of continual good fortune. Sometimes, though, it’s good to be lucky.

There is a Constant Buzzing Outside

It happens every seventeen years, for a few short weeks. Even the rain, finally falling, can’t stop it. The birds, like this Redwing blackbird at Huntley Meadows, seem to have found a new source of protein.

A Little Stravinsky (figuratively and a little NFSW)

I don’t really get Igor, but there is no question that he is a genius. I can say the same about Rothko. Though in small doses, both can be inspiring. With the weather getting warmer and the clock moving forward, it is that time of year (almost). The shovelers seem to have gotten the message. Then again, they are more primal by nature.

Seen at Huntley Meadows

Nothing spectacular. Just a few images of things that one can expect to see this time of the year (January) at Huntley Meadows, a local wildlife refuge in suburban Alexandria, Virginia. It’s a great place for a walk and for sightseeing.

Gull
Pattern breakers
Mergansers
Water flowing
Feathers caught in twigs

Same Subject, Different Day

Almost the same time in the morning as the other day, but boy, a little bit of light make a BIG bit of difference.

Drying out
Curiosity
Savoring a snack
Ice cap?
It can be a struggle.
In the end, the fish was cooked.
I hope you enjoyed the show!

Water World

It seems that way, at Huntley Meadows. At least in wintertime. The warblers are harder to find, the wading birds are much more plentiful. And once in a while, an unexpected guest. The clapper trail has left everyone buzzing about. And today was a good day to get a picture of this skittish bird.

And some of the other birds floating about.

The one constant presence at Huntley Meadows – Canadian geese.

And a warbler. Or something like it.

In the thicket of things.

Bluebird and Company

The most beautiful thing in life is what inspires awe and love for the world and the people around us. Sometimes, all it takes is a small blue bird. And some company.

Even when the focus is not quite there, it’s still a beautiful bird to behold.